Overview

The Dow Jones Industrial Average is one of the best-known icons of American culture and among stock market observers around the world. The Dow® along with the Dow Jones Transportation Average and the Dow Jones Utility Average were the world's first market indicators. Each of these three indices represents a select group of prominent U.S. companies. Together, they make up the Dow Jones Composite Average–a "blue-chip" microcosm of the U.S. stock market.

More recently introduced indices are The Global Dow, The Asia Dow and The Europe Dow, each of which seeks to track leading blue-chip companies according to the same underlying principles as the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

Also maintained are several dividend-focused indices that are derived from the Dow Jones Industrial Average, including the Dow Jones High Yield Select 10 Index, The Dow 10® and The Dow 5.

For more information on the Dow Jones Averages®, including educational content, data tools and more, visit www.djaverages.com.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average, also referred to as The Dow®, is a price-weighted measure of 30 U.S. blue-chip companies. The Dow® covers all industries with the exception of transportation and utilities, which are covered by the Dow Jones Transportation Average and Dow Jones Utility Average.

While stock selection is not governed by quantitative rules, a stock typically is added to The Dow® only if the company has an excellent reputation, demonstrates sustained growth and is of interest to a large number of investors. Maintaining adequate sector representation within the indices is also a consideration in the selection process.

The Global Dow is an equal-weighted, 150-stock index of blue-chip companies from around the world. The index includes companies that lead the global economy today—and are poised to do so in the future.

While stock selection is not governed by quantitative rules, a stock typically is added to The Global Dow only if the company has an excellent reputation, demonstrates sustained growth and is of interest to a large number of investors. The Global Dow differs from The Dow® in that it also places emphasis on representing the global leaders of tomorrow. Maintaining adequate sector representation within the indices is also a consideration in the selection process.

The Asia Dow is an equal-weighted, 30-stock index of blue-chip companies from the Asia/Pacific region. The index is maintained according to the same underlying philosophy as the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

While stock selection is not governed by quantitative rules, a stock typically is added to The Asia Dow only if the company has an excellent reputation, demonstrates sustained growth and is of interest to a large number of investors.

The Europe Dow is an equal-weighted, 30-stock index of blue-chip companies from Western Europe. The index is maintained according to the same underlying philosophy as the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

While stock selection is not governed by quantitative rules, a stock typically is added to The Europe Dow only if the company has an excellent reputation, demonstrates sustained growth and is of interest to a large number of investors. Maintaining adequate sector representation within the indices is also a consideration in the selection process.

The Dow Jones Transportation Average is a 20-stock, price-weighted index that represents the stock performance of large, well-known U.S. companies within the transportation industry. It was the first U.S. stock index, assembled by Charles Dow in 1884.

While stock selection is not governed by quantitative rules, a stock typically is added to the Dow Jones Transportation Average only if the company has an excellent reputation, demonstrates sustained growth and is of interest to a large number of investors.

The Dow Jones Utility Average is a 15-stock, price-weighted index that represents the stock performance of large, well-known U.S. companies within the utilities industry. It made its debut in January 1929.

While stock selection is not governed by quantitative rules, a stock typically is added to the Dow Jones Utility Average only if the company has an excellent reputation, demonstrates sustained growth and is of interest to a large number of investors.

The Dow Jones Composite Average is a 65-stock, price-weighted index that includes all components of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, Dow Jones Transportation Average and Dow Jones Utility Average.

The Dow Jones High Yield Select 10 Index measures the top ten companies in the Dow Jones Industrial Average selected based on indicated annual dividend yield each December. It is equal-dollar-weighted based on component stock closing prices on the last trading session of the year.

The Dow 10® represents the 10 stocks in the Dow Jones Industrial Average with the highest dividend yield, as of the end of December. It is equal-dollar-weighted based on component stock closing prices on the last trading session of the year.

The Dow 5 measures the five lowest-priced stocks in The Dow 10®, which in turn represents the 10 stocks in the Dow Jones Industrial Average with the highest dividend yield, as of the end of December. It is equal-dollar-weighted based on component stock closing prices on the last trading session of the year.

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